Biosensors

Biosensors

Biosensors are highly selective sensors that maintain their selectivity by a biological recognition element and pass a signal to an unselective sensor, the so-called transducer. As biological recognition elements, for example, enzymes, antibodies, cells or organisms can be used. They are usually permanently fixed on the transducer (so-called immobilization) enabling the performance of multiple measurements. Transducers can be based on optical, electrochemical, thermal or mechanical sensors.

TRACE is using a combination of immobilized enzymes and electrochemical transducers for the production of biosensors. This combination is extremely robust and versatile. The biosensor is mounted in a flow-through cell, see figure. This results in a compact measurement cell which can be preconfigured in tubesets for specific applications.

Analysis in the TRACE C2 Control or MultiTRACE  is a combination of enzymatic conversion and electrochemical detection. A dual-channel enzyme electrode coated with oxidase or a combination of an enzyme reactor with a platinum electrode (methanol | ethanol application) serves as the biosensor.

 

 

 

 


The basic principle of biosensors can be explained by the enzymatic conversion of glucose to gluconic acid (see figure). The enzyme Glucose oxidase (GOD) selectively recognizes its substrate glucose and oxidizes it to gluconic acid. At the same time oxygen is reduced to hydrogenperoxide (H2O2).

 

On the surface of the platinum electrode oxydation of hydrogenperoxide to oxygen takes place in parallel and releases two electrons, which can be measured as electrical current. Increase in concentration of glucose will result in more electrons released and an increase in current will be observed.

Depending on the application, the service life of the sensor system ensures 30 days or 5,000 measurements. The deviation from the average measurement is less than 1.5% for a measurement of 2 g/L glucose and 1 g/L lactate.

 

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